Henry, continued

Sorry to have a little bit of fun with Henry in the last posts…

The point is he was well known as a poet in his own time.  He was also known as a figure in government circles, associated with the UK Liberal Party.  His most famous works were the patriotic poems of Admirals All and Other Verses (London: Elkin Mathews, 1898) and the nostalgic poems of Clifton Chapel and Other School Poems (London: John Murray, 1908).

But, Aladore is his only “fantasy” novel.  It has some relation to his earlier historical romance novels, or the historical-timeslip novel The Old Country: A Romance (New York: Dutton, 1906).  However, it goes much further into the realm of fantasy than any of his other works.

Although it was published in the middle of his writing career, Aladore was Newbolt’s last novel.  As Robert Reginald remarks:

“that such a novel, with its emphasis on love and companionship at all levels, should appear on the eve of World War I is indeed ironic; Newbolt, who later wrote the official history of the British Navy in that conflict, never wrote another novel.”

[Robert Reginald, “Paladorean Idylls: Sir Henry Newbolt’s Aladore”, in Xenograffiti: Essays On Fantastic Literature (Wildside Press, 1996), 98.]

For a good (but brief) biography, check out The Poetry Foundation (an awesome resource for finding great poetry):

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/henry-newbolt

**Note: the Poetry Foundation bio gives Henry’s dates as 1862-1924, which is wrong–he died in 1938.

There is a lot more we could learn about Henry, but for the purposes of this project–we must move on!

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